More than 100 monitored for Ebola symptoms in Ohio


Oct. 15, 2014: The Frontier Airlines plane that Amber Vinson flew from Cleveland to Dallas on Monday, taxies away from the terminal at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland

Oct. 15, 2014: The Frontier Airlines plane that Amber Vinson flew from Cleveland to Dallas on Monday, taxies away from the terminal at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland

By Shaun Gibson @ShaunyNews

Health officials in Ohio are monitoring more than 100 people following the visit by a Dallas nurse who tested positive for Ebola shortly after returning to Texas from the Cleveland area.

Officials said Saturday that none of those being monitored are sick.

State officials previously said 16 people Amber Vinson had contact with were being monitored. Officials say the sharp increase is a result of the identification of airline passengers who flew with Vinson between Dallas and Cleveland and the identification of people who also visited the dress shop where her bridesmaids were trying on dresses.

Vinson’s stepfather is quarantined in his home in the Akron suburb of Tallmadge. That is where Vinson stayed during her visit.

The stepfather is the only person in the state under such a restriction.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/18/ebola-ohio-symptoms_n_6008228.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-2798438/More-100-monitored-Ebola-symptoms-Ohio.html

http://ksn.com/2014/10/18/more-than-100-monitored-for-ebola-symptoms-in-ohio/

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‘Who’s the idiot with the clipboard?’ Disbelief and panic as mystery man WITHOUT a hazmat suit


By Shaun Gibson @ShaunyNews

‘Who’s the idiot with the clipboard?’ Disbelief and panic as mystery man WITHOUT a hazmat suit helps second Ebola nurse board her plane to Atlanta, disposes waste and then climbs aboard

Is he with the CDC? Both the ambulance company and Emory University Hospital said the unprotected man with the clipboard (center) is not one of their employees - meaning he is likely a CDC employee Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2794854/what-thinking-mystery-man-without-hazmat-suit-seen-helping-2nd-ebola-nurse-board-plane-atlanta-joining-them.html#ixzz3GKgbbXCZ

Is he with the CDC? Both the ambulance company and Emory University Hospital said the unprotected man with the clipboard (center) is not one of their employees – meaning he is likely a CDC employee

  • Man casually dressed in shirt and pants seen on TV walking with Ebola patient Amber Vinson
  • He carried a clipboard and walked alongside Ms Vinson and healthcare workers who were ALL dressed in hazmat suits
  • He has been identified as a supervisor for Phoenix Air, the company that flew Miss Vinson to Atlanta  
  • Miss Vinson walked onto the plane in Dallas and the man without protection also boarded the plane, flying with her to Atlanta, Georgia
  • Social media has dubbed him the ‘clipboard man’ – expressing shock that he came so close to an infected patient and unprotected 

As news helicopters swarmed over Dallas’ Love Field on Wednesday evening to watch the second U.S. nurse to contract Ebola board a private plane bound for Atlanta, one lone mysterious man stood out from the pack. Holding a clipboard and directing the transfer, the unidentified man seemed to be the only person on the tarmac without protective clothing, wearing just a button down shirt and slacks. While Ebola is not an airborne disease, his presence so close to patient Amber Vinson’s medical team sparked fears after he was seen grabbing a container and hazmat trash bag from one of the workers’ in full-protective gear and later boarding the flight.  He then flew with Vinson and the other hazmat-suited medical staff to Atlanta and local television crews spotted him with the stricken nurse as she disembarked at the airport in Georgia to be transferred to Emory University Hospital. US Media reports that the man is a supervisor for Phoenix Air, the company that flew Miss Vinson from Dallas to Atlanta. When the plane landed in Atlanta, the man had still not donned any protective clothing and was seen openly interacting with Vinson and the other medical professionals caring for the nurse.

A man in plain clothes was seen on the tarmac Wednesday afternoon, as the second Ebola patient (in yellow hazmat suit) boarded a flight to Atlanta, Georgia

A man in plain clothes was seen on the tarmac Wednesday afternoon, as the second Ebola patient (in yellow hazmat suit) boarded a flight to Atlanta, Georgia

The man is seen boarding the flight, after exchanging several objects with the hazmat crew

The man is seen boarding the flight, after exchanging several objects with the hazmat crew

Clipboard man appears to have flown on the same flight as infected Miss Vinson, as he is seen in footage of her getting into an ambulance at an airport in Atlanta

Clipboard man appears to have flown on the same flight as infected Miss Vinson, as he is seen in footage of her getting into an ambulance at an airport in Atlanta

Members of the public watching were struck with disbelief at the man’s decision to throw caution to the wind. ‘He needs to be put on watch the second the plane lands so he does not infect anyone in Atlanta. This needs to be contained and I for one will be ticked of I hear a report next week that he is the next victim!’ Dean Pitts wrote on NBC Dallas’ website. Phoenix Air, which operates the special air ambulances that  have also flown all five American Ebola patients from West African to the US, claimed the unprotected man actually made the process safer. ‘Our medical professionals in the biohazard suits have limited vision and mobility and it is the protocol supervisor’s job to watch each person carefully and give them verbal directions to insure no close contact protocols are violated,’ a Phoenix Air spokesman told ABC. ‘There is absolutely no problem with this and in fact insures an even higher level of safety for all involved.’

A CDC spokesman told KTVT that they didn’t think anything was wrong with the interaction since he ‘kept a safe distance’. Miss Vinson’s flight landed in Atlanta around 7:45pm Eastern Time. Social media was as equally impressed as they were dumbfounded by the man who has quickly become known as ‘clipboard man’ online. Dan Hevia said what many shocked viewers must have immediately thought when they saw the brave or foolhardy individual when he wrote, ‘I’d like to know who the dude with the clipboard is so I can avoid him. C’mon! Another incredulous witness was staggered, asking, ‘My infectious disease training may be a bit limited but fairly sure that clipboard isn’t Ebola proof.’ Others went straight to the heart of the matter, with Lib Media Exposed asking, ‘Who’s the idiot who thinks all the protection he needs from Ebola is a f******’ clipboard?’ Another Twitter user, Luke Murray pointed out that ‘clipboard man’ might be the recipient of a dubious prize, should the worst come to the worst. ‘So much for protocols,’ wrote Lurray. ‘Clipboard dude in the pic with nurse 2 is up for a Dawrin Award should something happen to him.’ The mystery man on the tarmac is just the latest questionable practice highlighted in the CDC’s handling of the Ebola outbreak in America, which started when Liberian patient Thomas Eric Duncan was initially turned away from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital last month after reporting a high fever.

1413418381608_Image_galleryImage_As_coverage_of_the_transp1413418408506_wps_18_image001_png

The man with the clipboard is seen grabbing various objects from the hazmat team, raising questions about whether he could have been contaminated. Despite telling health care workers that he had recently returned from Liberia, he was not tested for Ebola, and was instead sent home with antibiotics. He returned home to his family’s apartment and continued to get worse over the next several days. It was only when he was taken to the hospital a second time, that time by ambulance, that medics discovered he had Ebola. And in the initial days of Duncan’s treatment, nurses at the Dallas hospital revealed that they were given ‘no protocols’ on how to dress when caring for the Ebola patient. That confusion led nurse Nina Pham, 26, to report to the hospital on Friday when she noticed a spike in her temperature. Just four days later, her co-worker Miss Vinson, became the second nurse at the hospital to contract the disease. The CDC is currently monitoring more than 75 health care workers at the hospital who came into contact with Duncan during his stay. He passed way from the disease last week.

A plane carrying Miss Vinson, who tested positive for Ebola, departs Love Field for Atlanta

A plane carrying Miss Vinson, who tested positive for Ebola, departs Love Field for Atlanta

The worsening Ebola problem led President Obama to abruptly cancel a planned campaign trip on Wednesday, deciding to meet with his Cabinet on the issue instead. Obama’s decision to nix the trip – just a few hours before Air Force One was scheduled to depart – reflected the urgency facing the administration amid the American public’s escalating concerns about potential spread of the virus.

Ebola patient Amber Vinson arrives by ambulance at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta yesterday

Ebola patient Amber Vinson arrives by ambulance at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta yesterday

Miss Vinson's plane landed in Atlanta around 7:45pm Eastern Time. She was then seen being loaded into an ambulance (pictured) to be taken to Emory University Hospital

Miss Vinson’s plane landed in Atlanta around 7:45pm Eastern Time. She was then seen being loaded into an ambulance (pictured) to be taken to Emory University Hospital

Press secretary Josh Earnest said on Wednesday that Obama still had confidence in CDC Director Tom Frieden. However, the president admitted that Ebola needs to be fought in a ‘much more aggressive way’. ‘What we’ve been doing here is reviewing exactly what we know about what’s happened in Dallas,’ Obama said Wednesday, ‘and how we’re going to make sure that something like this is not repeated – and that we are monitoring, supervising, overseeing in a much more aggressive way exactly what has taken place in Dallas initially, and making sure that the lessons learned are then transmitted to hospitals and clinics all across the country.’  This comes as President Barack Obama pledged on Wednesday to approach new cases of the Ebola virus in a ‘much more aggressive way,’ signaling that his administration hasn’t already been doing all it can to slow the advance of the deadly contagion. As pressure grows on the administration to explain how it has failed to contain the disease in Texas, the president said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would launch a ‘rapid response SWAT team’ within 24 hours whenever a new case is confirmed.

A Frontier Airlines jet carrying Dallas nurse Amber Jay Vinson crisscrossed America's skies

A Frontier Airlines jet carrying Dallas nurse Amber Jay Vinson crisscrossed America’s skies

The CDC team, he said, will ‘take local hospitals step by step through what needs to be done.’ Obama’s comments to the press came after a hastily called all-hands-on-deck cabinet meeting that lasted two hours and pre-empted a pair of planned political campaign appearances in New Jersey and Connecticut. The president’s promise to get more serious about Ebola mirrors a vow on Monday from CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden, who said his agency would ‘double down’ on disease surveillance and interventions.

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U.S. health official allowed new Ebola patient on plane with slight fever


Ebola

By Shaun Gibson : @ShaunyNew

(Reuters) – A second Texas nurse who has contracted Ebola told a U.S. health official she had a slight fever and was allowed to board a plane from Ohio to Texas, a federal source said on Wednesday, intensifying concerns about the U.S. response to the deadly virus. The nurse, Amber Vinson, 29, flew from Cleveland to Dallas on Monday, the day before she was diagnosed with Ebola, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said. Vinson told the CDC her temperature was 99.5 Fahrenheit (37.5 Celsius). Since that was below the CDC’s temperature threshold of 100.4F (38C), “she was not told not to fly,” the source said. The news was first reported by CNN. Chances that other passengers were infected were very low because Vinson did not vomit on the flight and was not bleeding, but she should not have been aboard, CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden told reporters

Not a big Fox News fan as I believe they scare the USA! Anyway

Congress will hold a hearing on Thursday on the U.S. response to Ebola, with Frieden and other officials scheduled to testify.

Vinson was isolated immediately after reporting a fever on Tuesday, Texas Department of State Health Services officials said. She had treated Liberian patient Thomas Eric Duncan, who died of Ebola on Oct. 8 and was the first patient diagnosed with the virus in the United States. Vinson was transferred to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta by air ambulance and will be treated in a special isolation unit. Three other people have been treated there and two have been discharged, the hospital said in a statement. Television images showed Vinson walking from an ambulance to an Emory hospital door with an escort, both of them in protective clothing. Vinson, a worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, had taken a Frontier Airlines flight to Cleveland from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport on Friday. She returned to Dallas on Monday aboard Frontier Flight 1143. The CDC said it was asking the more than 130 passengers who were also on the flight to call a CDC hotline.

LOW LIKELIHOOD OF OUTBREAK

In Washington, President Barack Obama said the likelihood of a widespread Ebola outbreak was “very, very low.” But he pledged a more aggressive response to U.S. Ebola cases. Obama met with Cabinet officials to discuss the government’s response after canceling trips to various U.S. states on Wednesday and Thursday to focus on the Ebola crisis. House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner, an Ohio Republican, said Obama should consider a temporary ban on travel to the United States from countries suffering from an Ebola outbreak.

At least 4,493 people, predominantly in West Africa, have died in the worst Ebola outbreak since the disease was identified in 1976. The virus can cause fever, bleeding, vomiting and diarrhea, and spreads through contact with bodily fluids. Vinson’s trip to visit family members in Ohio put a second U.S. metropolitan area on Ebola alert. She is related to three Kent State University employees and the school’s health services director, Dr. Angela DeJulius, said they had been asked to remain off campus for 21 days.

They will monitor themselves for possible symptoms of Ebola, she said.

Cleveland Clinic and the Metro Health System said they had put on paid leave employees, mostly nurses, who were on Vinson’s flight to Cleveland from Dallas. They were returning from a nursing conference in Texas. The Ohio health department said the CDC was sending staff to Ohio to help coordinate Ebola efforts. U.S. airlines stocks tumbled again on Wednesday on renewed fears of a drop-off in air travel. Ebola concerns also contributed to a 1 percent drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which was under pressure from global economic worries. Over the weekend, nurse Nina Pham, 26, became the first person to be infected with Ebola in the United States. She had cared for Duncan during much of his 11 days in the hospital.

National Nurses United, which is both a union and a professional association for U.S. nurses, said on Tuesday that the hospital lacked protocols to deal with an Ebola patient.

‘PILED TO THE CEILING’

Basic principles of infection control were violated by both the hospital’s Infectious Disease Department and CDC officials, the nurses said in a statement, with no one picking up hazardous waste “as it piled to the ceiling.” The hospital said in a statement that it had instituted measures to create a safe working environment and it was reviewing and responding to the nurses’ criticisms. The hospital also said it would offer a room to any affected worker who wanted to avoid the possibility of exposing other people to the Ebola virus. Dr. Daniel Varga, the chief clinical officer for Texas Health Resources, which includes Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, will apologize on Thursday for mistakes made in treating Duncan, the man who died of Ebola in Dallas. “We did not correctly diagnose his symptoms as those of Ebola. We are deeply sorry,” he said in online testimony prepared for the congressional hearing. The Dallas County Commissioners Court is set on Thursday to discuss whether to ask Governor Rick Perry to declare a local emergency. The declaration would help reimburse Dallas County for expenses related to Ebola. Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said at a news conference that Vinson, the second infected nurse, lived alone and health officials moved quickly to clean affected areas and to alert her neighbors and friends. A decontamination could be seen taking place at her residence.

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CDC, USA: Second Texas health care worker with Ebola traveled to Ohio


CDC: Ebola patient shouldn't have flown

CDC: Ebola patient shouldn’t have flown

(CNN) — The second Dallas health care worker who was found to have the Ebola virus should not have boarded a commercial jet Monday, health officials say. Because she had helped care for Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan, and because another health worker who cared for Duncan had been diagnosed with Ebola, the worker was not allowed to travel on a commercial plane with other people, said Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The worker had a temperature of 99.5 Fahrenheit (37.5 Celsius) before she boarded her flight, he added. Health care workers who had been exposed to Duncan were undergoing self-monitoring. They were allowed to travel but not on a commercial plane with other people, Frieden said.

Moving forward, the CDC will ensure that no one else in such a situation travels outside of a closed environment, he said. The worker is Amber Vinson, 29, a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. She was confirmed to have Ebola overnight. Now, she will be transferred from the Dallas hospital to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, which has successfully treated two other patients. It is now treating a third: a male health care worker who was infected in Sierra Leone. Vinson is “ill but clinically stable,” Frieden said. The first Dallas health care worker with Ebola, Nina Pham, is in “improved condition,” Frieden said. It has not been determined whether she will be transferred to another facility. Both Dallas health workers had “extensive contact” with Duncan on October 28-30, when he had “extensive production of body fluids” such as vomit and diarrhea, Frieden told reporters in a conference call.

CDC wants to interview passengers

The risk of exposure to the passengers who were on the plane with Vinson is low, since she did not yet have symptoms, health officials said Wednesday. The Ebola virus is not contagious before symptoms set in. Still, the CDC wants to interview all 132 passengers who were on the plane with her. “Because of the proximity in time between the evening flight and first report of illness the following morning, CDC is reaching out to passengers who flew on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth Oct. 13,” the CDC said in a statement. The flight landed Monday at 8:16 p.m. CT. The woman “exhibited no symptoms or sign of illness while on Flight 1143, according to the crew,” Frontier Airlines said in a statement. Vinson flew from Dallas-Fort Worth to Cleveland a week ago, on October 8, said Toinette Parrilla, director of the Cleveland Department of Public Health. Frontier Airlines, however, said she traveled to Ohio on October 10 — and specifically asked people who may have been on a flight on that date to contact the CDC at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636). The CDC, in a joint news release with Frontier, said it wanted to speak only with passengers on the October 13 flight. The CDC later confirmed to CNN that it is “only interested” in the passengers on Flight 1143. The October 13 flight was cleaned thoroughly after it landed, “per our normal procedures which is consistent with CDC guidelines,” the airline said. After the airline was informed of the Ebola patient, the plane was removed from service. After going through decontamination, the plane was going back into service on Wednesday, Ricky Smith, Cleveland’s Director of Port Control, said at a news conference. Both the CDC and the airline were comfortable that it was safe to resume operations, he said.

In a sign of growing concerns about Ebola, President Barack Obama canceled trips to New Jersey and Connecticut on Wednesday to convene a meeting at the White House of Cabinet agencies coordinating the government’s response to the outbreak.

Hospital denies ‘institutional problem’

Vinson, who lives alone, is in isolation at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. The news that she contracted Ebola cast further doubt on the hospital’s ability to handle the virus and protect employees. It’s the same hospital that initially sent Duncan home, even though he had a fever and had traveled from West Africa. By the time he returned to the hospital, his symptoms had worsened. He died while being treated by medical staff, including the two women who have contracted the disease. “I don’t think we have a systematic institutional problem,” Dr. Daniel Varga, chief clinical officer of Texas Health Resources, told reporters, facing questions about the hospital’s actions. Medical staff “may have done some things differently with the benefit of what we know today,” he said, adding, “no one wants to get this right more than our hospital.” People in the Vinson’s office building were informed when officials went door to door, and also through early morning reverse 911 calls, officials said. The health care worker had no pets, authorities said.

More than 120 being monitored

Seventy-five health care workers in Dallas are being monitored for any Ebola symptoms, Varga said. Separately, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins, who is overseeing the response efforts, said 48 other people in the community still are being monitored after having contact with Duncan, who was Dallas’ first Ebola patient. Those 48 are asymptomatic, and Sunday will mark the end of the window in which they could get sick. The second worker reported a fever Tuesday and was immediately isolated, health department spokeswoman Carrie Williams said. The virus is not contagious before there are symptoms. A preliminary Ebola test was done late Tuesday at the state public health laboratory in Austin, and the results came back around midnight. A second test will be conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.  “Health officials have interviewed the latest patient to quickly identify any contacts or potential exposures, and those people will be monitored,” the health department said. The worker’s apartment and car will be cleaned Wednesday, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said.

Official: Duncan should have been moved

An official close to the situation says that in hindsight, Duncan should have been transferred immediately to either Emory University Hospital in Atlanta or Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. Those hospitals are among only four in the country that have biocontainment units and have been preparing for years to treat a highly infectious disease like Ebola. “If we knew then what we know now about this hospital’s ability to safely care for these patients, then we would have transferred him to Emory or Nebraska,” the official told CNN senior medical correspondent Elizabeth Cohen. “I think there are hospitals that are more than ready, but I think there are some that are not.”

Troubling allegations

Also Tuesday, National Nurses United made troubling allegations about the hospital, claiming “guidelines were constantly changing” and “there were no protocols” about how to deal with the deadly virus.” “The protocols that should have been in place in Dallas were not in place, and that those protocols are not in place anywhere in the United States as far as we can tell,” NNU Executive Director RoseAnn DeMoro said. “We’re deeply alarmed.” Nurses were told to wrap their necks with medical tape when equipment left their necks exposed; they felt unsupported and unprepared, and they received no hands-on training, union co-president Deborah Burger said. A Texas Health Presbyterian spokesman did not respond to the specific allegations but said patient and employee safety is the hospital’s top priority.

Global epidemic

While the Texas hospital deals with its third Ebola patient, the situation in West Africa is getting increasingly dire. A total of 4,493 people are confirmed to have died from Ebola this year, from Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Spain and the United States, the World Health Organization said Wednesday. There could be 10,000 new Ebola cases per week in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea by the end of this year as the outbreak spreads, the WHO warned Tuesday.