Scottish Referendum Debate Rages On As Alex Salmond Threatens ‘Revenge’


Alex Salmond Reveals The White Paper For An Independent Scotland

Stepped down as 1st Minister so he could do more for Scotland

By Shaun Gibson : @ShaunyNews

Alex Salmond has hinted at another referendum on Scottish independence taking place as he threatened to exact “revenge” if pledges promised by the government are not fulfilled.

As MPs in the House of Commons debated the promise of more powers for Scotland, the SNP leader accused David Cameron of “reneging” on pledges promised in the run up to the historic vote and warned there would be consequences if the No parties fail to deliver more powers for Scotland. The debate erupted into a heated clash between William Hague and Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown, the latter of whom argued that “crude” Tory plans risked undermining the UK in the wake of the referendum. Salmond’s comments also came as a senior Labour MP warned that the refusal of some supporters of independence to accept the result of the 55% to 45% ‘No’ vote will “poison” politics in Scotland. Glasgow South West MP Iain Davidson, the chairman of the Commons Scotland committee, told MPs today that politicians and voters should “accept that there was a clear and decisive result”. “It appears that no form of devolution will satisfy those who are in favour of separation,” he said. “We ares starting to see not just an unhappiness about the result but an actual rejection of the result. A myth of betrayal is being put forward.” Davidson said there was now a “grievance a day mentality” on the part of the SNP and supporters of the unsuccessful ‘Yes’ campaign. “That is going to poison, potentially, Scottish politics,” he said.

But Salmond has insisted that Cameron is set on letting down Scottish nationalists.

So far, not good on his word

So far, not good on his word

“The Prime Minister started the process of reneging on the commitment when he came out of Downing Street hours after the referendum and said that progress in Scotland should be in tandem with … constitutional change in England. Even Gordon Brown is finding it difficult to stomach,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. Indicating that he did not view another referendum as completely off the agenda, he added: “What I said was that the referendum was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” he said. “My view is that constitutional referendums came along once every political generation – about every 20 years or so. “Circumstances obviously can change. Clearly, if you had a situation where three leaders made such a public vow – not even a political promise but a vow – in the last few desperate hours when they thought they were losing the referendum campaign and then reneged upon it, then that would obviously be a very, very substantial change of circumstances. “These matters ultimately are for the people of Scotland to decide. It is for the people of Scotland to decide whether it is satisfactory to be conned and tricked by Westminster leaders, or they will exact a revenge at the ballot box.”

But Leader of the House of Commons William Hague said Salmond was “almost looking for and hoping for some sense of betrayal”. The Tory minister told Today: “Let it be very clear that every commitment made by not only the Conservative but Labour and Liberal Democrat parties about what would happen if the result of the Scottish referendum was No, every commitment has so far been kept and will be.  “We have said, the Prime Minister and I have said, that those things should go in tandem. But they are not tied in the sense that one is dependent on the other. “The commitments to Scotland are unconditional and will go ahead – this is an absolute 100% clear commitment that will go ahead whatever we decide or don’t decide about England.

“But it is our view that fairness to the whole of the UK means the party should also agree on the same timetable the consequences for Scottish MPs voting on English matters. “If they can’t, then of course it will be a matter we all debate in the general election campaign. This is a democratic country. The people will decide.” Earlier, Hague clashed with Brown, who warned “nations can collapse by accident”. Brown said excluding MPs from non-English constituencies from some votes would erode the “stability and harmony of the British constitution”. “You cannot have one UK if you have two separate classes of MP,” he said. “You cannot have representatives elected by the people who are half in and half out of the law making process.” Brown has already warned that Cameron’s plans to ban Scottish MPs from voting on English laws risk breaking the “fragile” Union.

HAD NO MANDATE TO MAKE PROMISES!

HAD NO MANDATE TO MAKE PROMISES!

The former Labour leader said combined with plans to devolve total control over income tax to Holyrood, Cameron’s proposals were a “lethal cocktail” that could end the United Kingdom. Brown accused the PM of playing “fast and loose” with the constitution, prompting mockery from the SNP who said his input to the debate since the vote had become “increasingly surreal”. Cameron today accused Labour of “not being interested in fairness” for the UK after it decided to boycott talks on English votes for English laws. Ed Miliband’s party denounced the talks being led by Hague as “a closed-shop stitch-up” when “proper reform” is needed. But the Prime Minister rejected the suggestion that he was playing politics with the Union following the vow made to the people of Scotland during the referendum campaign. He said: “What we need is obviously more devolution for Scotland but a settlement that’s fair for the whole of the United Kingdom. “I think it’s a matter of great regret if Labour are going to walk out of this Cabinet committee which they could join in and make their suggestions. “But obviously they are not interested in fairness across the United Kingdom so we will have to work hard with other partners to make sure we deliver.”

http://www.newsnow.co.uk/h/Current+Affairs/Scotland/Scottish+Independence

http://www.theindependenceconversation.com/2014/10/15/news-scottish-referendum-debate-rages-on-as-alex-salmond-threatens-revenge-huffington-post-uk/

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Nicola Sturgeon: The power now lies with Scotland


Nicola Sturgeon meets Yes supporters during the referendum campaign.

Nicola Sturgeon meets Yes supporters during the referendum campaign.

By Shaun Gibson : @ShaunyNews

IN Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Macduff asks: “Stands Scotland where it did?” And Ross answers: “Alas, poor country! Almost afraid to know itself.”

Despite the referendum delivering a No, Scotland does not stand in the same place as it did before the vote. We have moved forward, and must continue doing so. There is a real sense– and not just on the side of those of us who voted Yes – that Westminster is obligated to take its cue for more powers from what people in Scotland want. The word “devolution” is no longer adequate, for that describes a process of handing down carefully circumscribed powers from on-high to a relatively passive people.

Scotland is now more politically engaged and assertive than at any stage of the democratic era. For a few remarkable weeks, culminating in the entire Westminster establishment abandoning business and upping sticks to pay a panic visit to Scotland, the desires of what people in Scotland want – whether independence or substantial more powers – set the agenda. There is no going back – and much as they might have wanted to, Whitehall politicians and mandarins cannot put us back in a devolved box. Even better, the level of popular involvement and debate sparked by the referendum means that I believe this nation knows itself better than ever. Our strengths and weaknesses, virtues and faults, were played out in the full glare of national and international publicity. The picture that emerged may not have been perfect – and the intolerance of the tiny minority on both sides must be acknowledged and addressed – but we did emerge with huge credit at home and abroad with much to be proud of in the way we conducted ourselves in this biggest democratic exercise in Scotland’s history.

Fear from the self-proclaimed “Project Fear” undoubtedly played a role in determining the outcome, but I believe that the referendum has marked the high tide in this factor deciding how our nation should be governed. From hereon in, regardless of the referendum outcome, there is a new self-confidence in the land demanding powers for a purpose – the ability to create more jobs and tackle the gross inequality that scars our country. That is the project which all of Scotland is now focused on. But in looking forward, it is always instructive to revisit the past and look for lessons. Let me make a confession. While I was never complacent, I did believe up until polls closed, that Yes would win. My principal reason for this was that everywhere I went I detected a hunger for change – a belief that we could manage the resources of Scotland far better and more fairly than the Tories are doing, or than any Westminster government ever can. This faith in the abilities of the people of Scotland – and desire to use the full levers of power to build a fairer society – was strong enough to deliver a Yes vote. The countless canvassing sessions and public meetings I did in every corner of the country, particularly as we neared polling day, convinced me of that. I suspect that the other side felt it too, which explains why Westminster threatened us with the proverbial Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse should we have the temerity to exercise our democratic right to independence.

I was amused to see Ed Miliband say recently that “the deck is stacked” in favour of those who have all the power in society – seemingly oblivious to the fact that in the referendum Labour chose to side with the Tories and the establishment to keep political and economic power in the hands of those who already have it. People soaked up and discounted a huge amount of the scaremongering because the prize of independence and what it could bring was so valuable – job creating powers, an end to austerity levels of public spending, transformative childcare, protecting our NHS in a written constitution, and ridding Scotland of Trident. But in the end we have to accept that threats of higher supermarket prices and business relocation – empty and orchestrated from Downing Street though they were – diverted attention and undermined confidence. In the circumstances, achieving 45 per cent and 1.6 million votes for an independent Scotland was remarkable, and, in my opinion, will be judged in days to come as the moment which determined that independence was a question of “when, not if”.

I believe that there is a strong relationship between the extent of the powers we wield in the Scottish Parliament, and people’s confidence in our abilities to succeed as an independent country. Indeed, that is one reason why Westminster always sought, first, to refuse Scottish self-government, and then to minimise its scope, particularly in the spheres of financial, economic and welfare powers. Put simply, the more responsibilities we can demonstrate Scotland is capable of successfully discharging – and the more these are used to build a fairer country and more economic opportunity for all – the less people will heed the siren voices claiming that to go further would cause the sky to fall in. In 1979, when there was no modern, democratic experience of Scottish self-government at all, a majority could barely be mustered for a modest measure of devolution. In 2014, after 15 years of a successful Scottish Parliament, we came within 5 per cent of achieving a majority for independence. Therefore, the last card played by the Westminster parties to achieve a No vote – the promise of “extensive new powers” – may in time turn out to be a trump card for building confidence in independence. These new powers cannot simply be what we have now with a few add-ons.

We will hold the Unionist parties to their vow – which Gordon Brown said within two years would be “as close to a federal state” as is possible in the UK, and “a modern form of Scottish home rule”. Additional powers which answer to the description of either home rule or federalism require both a quantitative and qualitative enhancement of Scottish self-government, especially in the core areas of finance, the economy and welfare. These were, of course, the very areas where the No campaign depicted doom and gloom if decisions were taken at Holyrood rather than Westminster. However, squaring that circle is Westminster’s difficulty – Scotland’s opportunity lies in gaining the powers we were promised in return for a No vote, and ensuring that we use them wisely for the benefit of the commonweal.

If that is what transpires – and unless it is then the vow to the 55 per cent who voted No, as well as the 45 per cent who voted Yes, will have been broken – then Scotland will be self-governing to an extent which would render a future “Project Fear” attack on the implications of independence risible. So while the referendum result did not go our way, these are still good times for Scotland. We have an electorate that is engaged in the democratic process as never before, and people formerly of both the Yes and No camps finding common ground and coming together to claim our rights from Westminster. This can and should be a unifying process for Scotland, after what was inevitably a divisive referendum, and I will do everything I can to make it so. The prize is social and economic gains for hard-working people – and progress for Scotland. For me, that is what the political process is all about.

http://www.newsforscotland.com/news/nicola-sturgeon-the-power-now-lies-with-scotland

http://www.news-papers.co.uk/news/nicola-sturgeon-the-power-now-lies-with-scotland-2611438.html

http://freshnews-uk.com/news/nicola-sturgeon-the-power-now-lies-with-scotland

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Clegg ‘guarantor’ for new Scottish powers


Cleg

Nick Clegg said new powers would be delivered, despite Conservative “noises”

By @ShaunyGibson – Used to be @ ShaunyNews

More stalling for time? More lies? Bit of good news? Call it as you read it.. I think it’s stalling tactics for a Government who’s back bencher’s are saying ‘No’ to Devomax..

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has declared himself the “guarantor” in government over delivering more powers for Scotland. At the same time, he has expressed irritation with Prime Minister David Cameron in linking the issue with English votes for English laws. Meanwhile UK Chancellor George Osborne said Westminster ministers would soon publish a paper on new Scots powers. SNP ministers have warned of a “backlash” if they are not delivered. In the wake of the independence referendum “No” vote, Mr Cameron said the UK government would deliver the new devolved powers promised to Scotland, but argued that the question of the voting rights of Scottish MPs at Westminster had to be addressed at the same time.

Devolution ideas

Ahead of the UK Liberal Democrat conference in Glasgow, Mr Clegg told BBC Scotland: “David Cameron did not mention it to me when we discussed across parties about how we would join forces to make that commitment to Scotland. “As the guarantor, if you like, in government, as the party which has the only Scottish people around the cabinet table, I can guarantee you that those powers will be delivered. “Whatever the noises from the Conservative party and others – it will be delivered in full on time, as promised.”

Meanwhile, Mr Osborne said the “command paper” on devolving further tax and spending powers, which the Westminster government had committed to releasing before the end of October, would be published within the next fortnight. Addressing business leaders at the Institute of Directors’ annual convention in London, Mr Osborne said: “There is the argument across the political parties that Scotland should have more devolution coming out of the Scottish referendum. “I can tell you in just over a week’s time, we will publish a command paper which will set out some of the ideas for further devolution for tax and spending to Scotland.”

Draft legislation on new powers for Scotland is due to be unveiled by 25 January.

Lord Smith said he wanted to her the views of members of the public

Lord Smith said he wanted to her the views of members of the public

However, the SNP seized on a report in The Herald newspaper, quoting an unnamed UK government minister who said Scotland would have to wait until 2017 for the full implementation of enhanced powers to Holyrood. SNP Westminster leader Angus Robertson, said: “The vow the Westminster leaders made to the people of Scotland in the run-up to the referendum promised to deliver substantial and ‘faster’ new powers. “In the event of a ‘Yes’ vote, independence would have been delivered in 18 months. Three years for further powers is simply not good enough. “It is time for the Scottish Parliament to have the powers we need to make Scotland a fairer, more equal country and address the causes of inequality.” Elsewhere, the Smith Commission, which is responsible for agreeing new powers for the Scottish Parliament, will hold its first full meeting later in the month.

Public input

Representatives of Holyrood’s five political parties will gather in Edinburgh on 14 October, ahead of aiming to get agreement on the way ahead by the end of November. Lord Smith has also asked members of the public to contribute their views on strengthening Holyrood’s powers before the deadline of 31 October, using the e-mail address haveyoursay@smith-commission.scot. “The referendum showed Scotland to be one of the most politically engaged countries in the world,” he said. “The campaign transcended normal politics with passionate debate happening online, over dinner tables and in the workplace. “Although the referendum is over the discussion has not finished; it has moved on to how the powers of the Scottish Parliament should be strengthened within the UK. “It is vital that the political process now under way properly engages the Scottish public so that their voice is heard as agreement is sought on new powers.”

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